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An Introduction to Galactic Chemical Evolution

Small book cover: An Introduction to Galactic Chemical Evolution

An Introduction to Galactic Chemical Evolution
by

Publisher: arXiv
Number of pages: 46

Description:
The formalism of the simple model of galactic chemical evolution (GCE) and its main ingredients (stellar properties, initial mass function, star formation rate and gas flows) are presented in this tutorial. It is stressed that GCE is not (yet) an astrophysical theory, but it merely provides a framework in which the large body of data concerning the chemical composition of stars and gas in galaxies may be interpreted.

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