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Galileo and Einstein by Michael Fowler

Small book cover: Galileo and Einstein

Galileo and Einstein
by

Publisher: UVa
Number of pages: 198

Description:
This course traces the historical development of some key scientific ideas: space, time, motion, mass and force. Philosophers, and more practical people, have struggled with these concepts since the earliest recorded times. Their combined efforts have been fruitful: real progress in understanding has evolved over the centuries.

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